Research Article

ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE AND EXTENDED SPECTRUM BETA-LACTAMASES AMONG PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM CATTLE AND CHICKEN IN NIGERIA.

UGBO E. N., UKPAI G. E., ELUU S. C., ILANG D. C., EGBULE U. C.


Abstract:

The objective of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance patterns and the production of extended spectrum beta lactamases by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli isolates obtained from cattle and chickens in Nigeria. Out of 150 animals samples analyzed, 76 bacterial isolates were observed. Twenty three were Pseudomonas aeruginosa while 53 were Escherichia coli. However, 15 (65.2 %), 32 (60.4 %) and 8 (34.8 %), 21 (39.6 %) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli isolates from cattle and chicken respectively. The antibiotic susceptibility studies showed an alarming level of resistance to all the tested antibiotics, reflecting multi-drug resistance strains. The isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli that were highly resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics were subjected to ESBL detection using double disc synergy test (DDST). A total of 11 (23.4 %) and 7 (24.1 %) isolates were identified to be ESBL-producers from cattle and chicken respectively. Thus, 4 (8.5 %), 7 (14.9 %) and 2 (6.9 %), 5 (17.2 %) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli isolates from cattle and chicken respectively. This study has reviewed and demonstrated the presence of multiple antibiotic resistant and distribution of ESBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli from animal origin. Thus, preventive measures like a continuous surveillance of the antibiotics used as growth promoter in farm animals, strict use of antibiotics on farm animals, establishment of veterinary antimicrobial resistance, monitoring program worldwide and a strict implementation of infection control practices can go a long way in containing the menace of drug resistance in our environment.

Keyword:

Antibiotics Resistance, ESBLs, Animals, P. aeruginosa, E. coli.